"Moreover, you scorned our people, and compared the Albanese to sheep, and according to your custom think of us with insults. Nor have you shown yourself to have any knowledge of my race. Our elders were Epirotes, where this Pirro came from, whose force could scarcely support the Romans. This Pirro, who Taranto and many other places of Italy held back with armies. I do not have to speak for the Epiroti. They are very much stronger men than your Tarantini, a species of wet men who are born only to fish. If you want to say that Albania is part of Macedonia I would concede that a lot more of our ancestors were nobles who went as far as India under Alexander the Great and defeated all those peoples with incredible difficulty. From those men come these who you called sheep. But the nature of things is not changed. Why do your men run away in the faces of sheep?"
Letter from Skanderbeg to the Prince of Taranto ▬ Skanderbeg, October 31 1460

FUSTANELLA

Sillni fotografi historike që dëshmojne anët e panjojtura të një ngjarje, personi, apo fenomeni historik, ose që ndihmojnë në favor të një teze historike.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1141

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:33 am

Kesaj here do te sjell nje fragment te thukte, qe shpjegon gjera interesante mbi fustanellen. Lexim te kendshem!
GRECIAN AND ALBANIAN COSTUMES.

The great variety of picturesque costume the traveller meets with throughout Greece, Albania, the coasts of Asia Minor, and the Levant, generally gives a singular charm and interest to his route. In continental Greece, not merely every province, but every district, nay, almost every town and village, has its distinctive dress: so that when the people are seen in crowds at fairs, or *oy common place of rendezvous, an attentive observer "I their costume can tell where they all come from, without reference to anything else. This is also the case in •he south of Italy, particularly in Calabria, Basilicata, ai|d Apulia, where the whole type of mauners and customs is much more Grecian than Italian. In the mountains that back and hem in northern Greece, and which are chiefly occupied by tribes descended from the peat Sclavonic race, the costume is essentially different rora that worn by the Greeks; and this costume, again,

is subdivided and modified according to the difference of tribes and clans. The kilt, differing only in colour from that worn by our Highlanders, is common to them all; and the whole dress, figure, and manner of living of the Arnaouts, or Albanians, struck Lord Byron as bearing a striking resemblance to those of the Gaels of Scotland. These Arnaouts always wear a red shawl round the head ;—their neighbours, the Montenigrini, wear a yellow one; and the Chimariots, the Gegdes, and other Sclavonic tribes, arc distinguished, not only by a difference of colour, but also by the fashion of their turbans, and the way in which they wear them. They all go armed; and the importance and wealth of an Albanian may be estimated by the number of weapons he bears upon his person, and the richness of their mountings and inlaying in silver, gold, and precious stones. The chief of a clan is frequently seen thus accoutred :—his long-barrelled, slim-stocked gun in his hand, four mounted pistols in his girdle, a sabre by his side, a large horn for powder, and a cartouchebox slung over his shoulder, a yataghan, and a short dagger stuck in his girdle to keep company with his pistols—in short, he is a walking mass of arms; and, though rude, undisciplined, and not worth much in an open field against regular troops, he is a dangerous enemy to encounter in irregular mountain-warfare. His taste for dress is almost as expensive as that for arms; his loose jacket is generally richly embroidered in gold; and the gyves, which descend from the knee to the ankle, and the massy clasps that fasten on his buskins or sandals, are pretty generally of the same metal, or at least richly ornamented with it. The colour of the kilt is white among all the tribes; and, however dirty may be the shirt, which is very seldom changed, it is the special care of the Albanian to keep the kilt spotless as new-fallen snow. A good deal of this care is also extended to the sheep-skin capote, which is worn, in a most graceful manner, over the right shoulder. We have been treating of a man of importance; but all ranks of Albanians have a passion for dress and finery, and, when not absolute paupers, contrive to go smartly attired and armed. The long gun is even more indispensable than a pipe to the Turk, or an umbrella to an Englishman in rainy weather. "This weapon," says Mr. Hobhouse, " is to be found in every cottage in Albania: the peasant carries it with him either when he tends his flocks or tills his land. It is the weapon in which he considers himself to excel, and he regards it both as his ornament and defence. The gun-barrels, however, are thin and ill-made, and the locks are of the rudest manufacture, the works being generally on the outside. Owing to this circumstance, and as the powder is large-grained, and otherwise very bad, the Albanians are not good marksmen, although they never fire without a rest, and take a very deliberate aim*."
Image
We fancy that, as marksmen, the Albanians vary in ability, for we saw some clans at Constantinople that fired with admirable precision. We believe, however, the powder furnished them by the Sultan was English. Their mode of practice was this :—they built up a tambour of loose stones, between three and four feet high, like those the Greeks loved to fight behind during (heir late war, and then, dropping on the knee, rested the barrel of their piece on a stone, and fired, after taking a cool aim. Some of these fellows were about the finest specimens of limb, make, and feature, that we ever beheld; but there is an expression of cunning and ferocity in the Arnaout countenance which renders it disagreeable. Many of them, from the snowy mountains of Albania and Thessaly, were as fair in complexion as Englishmen or Scotchmen: some of them had light

* 'A Journey through Albania, and other Provinces of turkey,' &c, Ac, by J, C. Hobheeaa.

brown hair, and not a few sandy-coloured hair. They wore no hair at all on the fore-part of their heads, but suffered it to flow down behind, in large quantities, from the top of the crown; it was generally in curls, but they are said to admire it most when straight and long. These hardy mountaineers, who were then about to take the field against the Russians, evidently carried their fortunes on their backs, for every one of them had some gold or silver worked in his jacket or vest. .As they are almost constantly at war, and as property is very insecure in their own turbulent country, we believe this portable, succinct mode of investing it, which also obtains among the Turks, is almost general among them.

Image

At Smyrna, we had an opportunity of watching the proceedings of two Albanians, who had recently left the service of the Pasha of Scio. With their heads turned

with the comparative freedom of that great sea-port, they plunged into all the dissipations it atforded, their main and capital pleasure, however, being drinking the rum and brandy carried thither by English, American, and French ships. They had little or no money, but they paid their way in uncoined metal. One of them had a small gold chain, of which he cut off so many links a day, according to their expenses, as long as it lasted. When this was drunk out, they drew upon the mountingand inlaying of their yataghans and pistols, and when that resource was exhausted, they began to strip the embroidery from their clothes. At last, having fairly drunk all the gold and silver olf their backs, they girded up their loins, slung their guns across their shoulders, and took their way into the interior of the country, to seek service from the Turkish governor of Magnesia. The only things of value they had left untouched when they departed from Smyrna were the silver mountings of their guns.

Image

The Albanians have the practice, so common among our sailors and people of various nations, of making figures on their arms and legs, by punctures which they colour with gunpowder. The custom is ancient, for Strabo informs us it was prevalent among the Illyrians. They are so fond of going smart, that nearly every man among them is an adept in tailoring, and can make his own clothes. In passing an Albanian corps-de-garde, we have often been amused by seeing a sturdy, tierce-looking fellow armed to the teeth, plying the needle with wonderful activity, and cutting and

patching with the address of a professional Schneider. They almost invariably carry about their persons a small quantity of cloth, red leather, catgut, some thread, and a large needle. These articles are usually wrapt up in part of the pouch which contains their cartridges. But there is another operation one is apt to see on passing their stations, which is not so agreeable to the eye. Though so fine, they are very filthy— they generally wear their shirts and under vestments till they rot on their skin, and they swarm with vermin, which they pick from themselves or from one another in public. The shaggy capote is also an admirable receptacle for all kinds of vermin. With his clean shirt and frequent change of linen, John Bull may put up with his queerly-cut clothes and his ugly hat, without envying the Albanian his picturesque attire, or the Turk his flowing robes. It has been said by travellers, and our own sad experience vouches for the correctness of the assertion, that in Turkey, from the highest rank to the lowest, it is difficult to find the person or the house of a single individual wholly free from this plague of Egypt, and almost impossible to avoid being invaded by it while travelling in that country; but the Christian physician of Ali Pasha at Yanina assured Lord Byron and Mr. Hobhouse that " Le pou des Albanais est le plus gras et le plus gros du monde." (The louse of the Albanians is the fattest and biggest in the world.) In addition to the small red cloth skull-cap, which in form resembles the cup of an acorn, those who can afford it wear a shawl bound round the head in the turban fashion. In cold weather they draw the ends of* this shawi over the ears and tie them under the chin, as will be seen in the annexed engraving.

This figure represents au Albanian soldier in all his glory j and in the days of old Ali Pasha there was a strong corps of Janissaries in his capital equally well dressed and splendidly appointed. The bosses on their knees and ancles were of silver filagreed, the bottom af
[graphic][merged small]

the sandal of goat-skin, the open work at the top of catput, studded with small silver stars. The Aghas and the superior officers of the Albanian Janissaries were wont to have their jackets made of rich velvet, and so inlaid with gold or silver that they had almost the stiffness of a coat of mail. "The whole Albanian costume," says Mr. Hobhouse, " when quite new and clean, is incomparably more elegant than any worn in the Turkish empire." And to this we may add that it has served as a model to several others of the sultan's former subjects, particularly to the Greeks of the Morea and Maina, and the mountaineers of Candia, who have copied it more or less closely, but confined the use of it to men of martial occupations.

Although they evidently think that dress makes the man, we shall not, in describing their garments, dwell upon the character and moral qualities of the Albanians. We may do this on a future occasion, but there is one little peculiarity that may he mentioned here. The majority of the clans profess to be Mohammedans, but there are many that profess to be Christians, and adhere to the ceremonies of the Greek church. But, Mohammedan or Christian, their religious faith sits so lightly upon them, that when in a country where the Turks are more numerous they go to the mosque, and when in districts where the Greeks are in large majority, aud mosques " few and far between," they go quietly to church, and in this manner the mass of them will chop and change about as often as the circumstances just related occur.

Every Turkish Pasha or Mootzellim of any importance has, or at least used to have a few years ago, a set of fierce-looking Albanians for his body guard. In this way they were scattered thickly over the whole of continental Greece, with the exception of the country of the Mainotes—a people as fierce and warlike as themselves. The partial adoption of their costume by the Greeks may have arisen from this circumstance, but it remains to be mentioned that many colonies of Albanians who, though they have lost the language and speak Greek, retain the dress, manners, and features of the great Sclavonic stock, have been settled for many ages in the plains of Greece. Thessaly, Boer.tia, Attica, and the Eastern Morea have long been full of their villages; and the men of the island of Hydra, who took so active, and, on the whole, so noble a part in the late wars against the Turks, are of Albanian and Sclavonian descent, and wear the Albanian dress. Moreover the Hellenic or true Greek blood, which must be looked for in its purity among the islands of the Archipelago, has been mixed up, by intermarriages with that of the Albanians, in a large part of the country, and hence would naturally arise a fusion of manners, customs, and dress. There may have been some other causes besides good taste, which would naturally give preference to such a costume, but this fact is certain, that most of the armed Greeks we met during the late war of independence, wore the white kilt, and nearly all the rest of the Albanian dress, which was also adopted by the English general Church, when he took the command of the Grecian army.

In this engraving there is no sheep-skin capote, but we have frequently seen it worn both by officers and men among the Greeks. In the groups of islands, the Cyclades and the Sporades, the Albanian kilt was less rarely seen; but there, as on the coast of Asia Minor, and at Constantinople, the Greeks wore loose trowsers like the Turks, but dyed blue, and had Turkish morocco boots and slippers over them instead of the buskin or sandal. This was also the case with the non-military Greeks in the Morea. The Turks prohibited them all the use of yellow slippers, and made them (under penalty of a bastinading) wear black or dingy-coloured ones. This exclusion and humiliating distinction was
[merged small][graphic]

[Greek Officer of Nauplia, or Napoli di Romania. J

The passion for dress and finery is common to the whole Greek race, high or low. The costume of the capitani, or feudal chieftains of the mountainous and always independent country of Maina, is or was very splendid and graceful. Mr. Morrit, in describing one of these capitatii, says,—" He wore a close vest with open sleeves of white and gold embroidery, and a short black velvet mantle edged with sables. The sash which held his pistols and his poignard was a shawl of red and gold. His light-blue trowsers were gathered at the knee, and below them were close gaiters of blue cloth with gold embroidery, and silver-gilt bosses to protect the ancles. When he left the house, he flung on bis shoulders a rich cloth mantle with loose sleeves, which was blue without aud red within, embroidered with gold in front and down the sleeves in the most sumptuous manner. His turban was green and gold. * * * The dress of the lower orders is in the same form, with the necessary variations in the quality of the materials and absence of the ornaments. It differed considerably from that of the Turks, and the shoes were made either of yellow or untanncd leather, and fitted tightly to the foot. The hair was never shaved *."

If our theatrical people would attend to a few descriptions like these, they would not be guilty of so many anomalies in costume. There have been some improvements of late, but, generally speakiug, the Turks and Greeks on our stage are no more like what they are meant to represent, than the Punch and Judy in our streets are like well-dressed English ladies and gentlemen.

* Memoirs relating to European ami Asiatic Turkey, edited from Manuscript Journals by Robert Walpole, M.A.

^The Penny magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful ..., Volume 5, Charles Knight, Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (Great Britain)
P.S: Fragmente te kesaj pjese, mbase jane postuar edhe me pare ne forum. Por, kesaj radhe kam dhene te plote pjesen. Kerkoj falje per ndonje gabim drejtshkrimor ne anglisht, per shkak se kovertimi nga libri i digjitalizuar ne google shpeshhere le fjale te coroditura qe nuk jane njohur nga kodi i kovertimit.
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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1142

Post by ALBPelasgian » Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:09 pm

Fustanella - kjo veshje shqiptare

(Per citatet e meposhtme falenderoj anetaren Adela nga forumi 'topix' per punen e saj te palodhur ne kete drejtim):


Since the war of Independence, the Albanian costume has become the national dress of continental Greece. The white kilt (fustanelld) with its many pleatings is now worn quite short, though a few old-fashioned people may still be seen with the more graceful skirt in use at the beginning of the century, which fell an inch or two below the knee.

^The customs and lore of modern Greece, Rennell Rodd, 1892, p.73
Many of the famous so-called "Greek" heroes of the War of Independence were, we are told, really Albanians. Even the "national" Greek dress — the fustanella— is in fact the dress of one of the great Albanian tribes, the Tosks

Source :
The pursuit of Greece: an anthology, Philip Sherrard,1964, p.10
It is quite likely that the Albanian fustanella, which was adopted by the Greeks after their liberation in 1821 as their national costume

^The nomads of the Balkans: an account of life and customs among the Vlachs of Northern Pindus, Alan John Bayard Wace, Maurice Scott Thompson, 1972, p.60
Albanian dress, as the Greek fustanella and gaiters are stolen without any change at all from the Tosk Albanian further south.

^Legends of my bungalow, Frederick Boyle, 1882,p. 243
...the dress of south Albania is adopted as a national costume of Greece...

^The Leisure hour By William Haig Miller, James Macaulay, William Stevens, p. 520
Albanian dress which in some respect resembles that of a ROMAN SOLDIER...

^Researches in Greece By William Martin Leake PAGE 253:
The Penny magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful ..., Volume 5 By Charles Knight..Page 181:

The albanian costume says mr Hobhouse when quite new and clean is incomparably more elegant than any other worn in Ottoman empire.AND TO THIS WE MAY ADD THAT IT HAS SERVED AS A MODEL TO SEVERAL OTHERS OF THE SULTAN'S FORMER SUBJECTS PARTICULARLY TO THE GREEKS OF THE MOREA AND MAINA AND THE MOUNTAINEERS OF CANDIA,WHO HAVE COPIED IT MORE OR LESS CLOSELY BUT CONFINED THE USE OF IT TO MEN OF MARTIAL OCCUPATIONS
The fustanella or white kilt of the traditional Albanian is as common in the streets of Athens as the private soldier's uniform in London

^Belgravia, a London magazine, conducted by M.E. Braddon
Belgravia, Mary Elizabeth Braddon – 1883
Page 270
Ne sot po hedhim faren me emrin Bashkim,
Qe neser te korrim frutin me emrin Bashkim!

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1143

Post by bardus » Fri Feb 10, 2012 10:38 am

Albpelasgian falemnderit per materialet dhe punen e mire qe ben.

Ja nje pikture e vitit 1881 e burrave te ashper te Shkodres me fustanella:
Image
Title
1881 WOODVILLE — A Night Entertainment During Ramazan, At Scutari, In Albania.
Stock Number ALBA 3
Artist R.C. Woodville
Date C1881
Size 375mm × 500mm
Condition In good condition.
Technique Original engraving

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1144

Post by cba » Sun Mar 04, 2012 11:06 pm

te dashur miq kam gjetur kete faqe qe ka edhe piktura te pa publikuara me pare me fustanella. Uroj qe ndonjeri te kete njohuri te mjaftueshme IT per ti shkarkuar ne permasa te medha dhe ti vendosi ne kete forum te vecante.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1145

Post by Patush » Mon Mar 05, 2012 1:43 am

cba wrote:te dashur miq kam gjetur kete faqe qe ka edhe piktura te pa publikuara me pare me fustanella. Uroj qe ndonjeri te kete njohuri te mjaftueshme IT per ti shkarkuar ne permasa te medha dhe ti vendosi ne kete forum te vecante.
Per cilen faqe e ke fjalen cba?
Liri-A-Vdekje
Qui tacet consentit
Heshtja eshte Hjeksi!

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1146

Post by cba » Mon Mar 05, 2012 1:35 pm

http://search.ppsimages.co.jp/cgi-bin/s ... d=ギリシャ独立戦争

kjo eshte faqja (link) e kisha vendosur dhe me pare por nuk e di pse nuk u shfaq dhe pse ka problem te hapet.

Mgjth une po kerkoja ne google (image) nje pikture nen ermin ( Delacroix / Janissaries attacking) dhe nder te tjera me doli kjo faqe me piktura qe pa publikuara me pare.


flm!

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1147

Post by Patush » Mon Mar 05, 2012 2:01 pm

cba wrote:http://search.ppsimages.co.jp/cgi-bin/s ... d=ギリシャ独立戦争

kjo eshte faqja (link) e kisha vendosur dhe me pare por nuk e di pse nuk u shfaq dhe pse ka problem te hapet.

Mgjth une po kerkoja ne google (image) nje pikture nen ermin ( Delacroix / Janissaries attacking) dhe nder te tjera me doli kjo faqe me piktura qe pa publikuara me pare.


flm!
Image

E ke fjalen per kyt pikture?
Liri-A-Vdekje
Qui tacet consentit
Heshtja eshte Hjeksi!

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1148

Post by Mallakastrioti » Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:07 pm

28-Nentor 1939. Kruje

Image
Image

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1149

Post by Arban Blandi » Fri May 18, 2012 8:21 pm

Angerer, Ludwig - 'Arnaut', 1855..

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Our Scribd Channel - History was a damn dim candle over a damn dark abyss.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1150

Post by Arban Blandi » Fri May 18, 2012 8:22 pm

P.Marubi, Shkodër - 'A man in traditional costume'..

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Our Scribd Channel - History was a damn dim candle over a damn dark abyss.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1151

Post by Arban Blandi » Fri May 18, 2012 8:47 pm

P.Marubi, Shkodër - 'Agostin Briott (french engineer of the Buna bridge construction in Shkodra) with his Son'..

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Our Scribd Channel - History was a damn dim candle over a damn dark abyss.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1152

Post by Zeus10 » Tue May 29, 2012 11:58 pm

Vazhdimesia e fustanelles dhe ne Veri:

Albanians (1904) Dibra

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1153

Post by Rina » Wed May 30, 2012 8:48 pm

Pikture nga P.J., Dy roje para portes 1888-1889

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1154

Post by Rina » Wed May 30, 2012 8:57 pm

Nje dukuri qe e verejme tek keto pikturat e P.J. eshte se duket qe shqiptaret e veriut te cilet ai i ka si frymezim per pikturat e tij, nen fustanelle sikur kane pasur te veshur edhe tirqit, apo keta pantallonat e veshjes tradicionale te veriut.

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Last edited by Rina on Wed May 30, 2012 9:05 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: FUSTANELLA

#1155

Post by Rina » Wed May 30, 2012 8:59 pm

Shqiptari duke pushuar, apo Shqiptari me llulle 1884-1885

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